Hypertension or high blood pressure is the most common medical problem that is encountered in pregnancy. In general gestational hypertension complicates 10% of first time pregnancies.

Mild pre-eclampsia affects up to 10% of first time pregnancies with severe pre-eclampsia affecting about 1-2 in 100 severe pregnancies. Pre-eclampsia is the most common of the serious complications of pregnancy. It is caused by a defect in the placenta, which joins the mother and baby and supplies the baby with nutrients and oxygen from the mother’s blood. While we do not know yet exactly what is the root cause of pre-eclampsia, medical science is expanding our knowledge every day. By definition, pre-eclampsia occurs after 20 weeks (but in very rare cases can occur earlier) and the majority of cases occur in the third trimester.

In its early stages pre-eclampsia is symptom-less and is only detectable by regular antenatal checks on the mother’s blood pressure and urine. Pre-eclampsia is known as a multi-system disorder which means it can affect different parts of your body such as your liver, your kidneys, your cardiovascular system or your clotting systems.

Further information

The following information is for anyone who is considered at risk of pre-eclampsia or eclampsia and wants to know more about the condition. If you would like a physical copy of any of the information listed below, please email us at info@apec.org.uk or telephone 01386 761 848.

Low-Dose Aspirin For High-Risk Pregnancy

Low-Dose Aspirin For High-Risk Pregnancy

This information is for anyone who is considered at risk of pre-eclampsia or eclampsia and wants to know more about how doses of aspirin, given daily, may help to prevent the disease.

HELLP_Syndrome

HELLP Syndrome

This publication is for anyone who has suffered from or may suffer from HELLP syndrome and wants to know more about the condition. It’s also for doctors and midwives involved in the care of former, current and potential sufferers.

Eclampsia

Eclampsia

This publication is for anyone who has suffered or may suffer from eclampsia, and for doctors and midwives involved with their care. It explains the nature, origins and dangers of the condition, gives guidance on prevention and management.

The expert referral scheme

We have a network of experts on pre-eclampsia who have agreed to offer one-off consultations or second opinions to those with queries and concerns; you have to be referred via your GP. For further information, and to discuss your concerns please contact the helpline on 01386 761 848 or email info@apec.org.uk.